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History Archives - Wildschut - Antiques & Oddities

15 Jun

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Portrait Painting Inspiration

June 15, 2017 | By |

Some fun ideas of what to do with old portrait paintings. Inspiration from Pinterest

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14 Jan

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Charles Dellschau – Secrets of the Aeros

January 14, 2016 | By |

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His story is one shrouded in mystery, almost lost forever, intertwined with secret societies, hidden codes, otherworldly theories and seemingly impossible inventions before his time.

In the fall of 1899, Charles A.A. Dellschau (1830–1923), a retired butcher from Houston, embarked on a project that would occupy him for more than 20 years. What began as an illustrated manuscript recounting his experiences in the California Gold Rush became an obsessive project resulting in 12 large, hand-bound books with more than 2,500 drawings related to airships and the development of flight.

Dellschau’s designs resemble traditional hot air balloons augmented with fantastic visual details, collage and text. The hand-drawn “Aeros” were interspersed with collaged pages called “Press Blooms,” featuring thousands of newspaper clippings related to the political events and technological advances of the period.

After the artist’s death in 1923, the books were stored in the attic of the family home in Houston. In the aftermath of a fire in the 1960s, they were dumped on the sidewalk and salvaged by a junk dealer.

In 1969, used furniture dealer Fred Washington bought 12 large discarded notebooks  from a garbage collector, where they found a new home in his warehouse under a pile of dusty carpets. Art history student, Mary Jane Victor, was scouring through his bazaar of castaways when she came upon the mysterious works of a certain Charles Dellschau.

Victor immediately notified the Art Director of Rice University, Dominique de Menil, Houston’s leading fine art patron, who snapped up four of the books and promptly put on an exhibition at the university entitled, “Flight”. Charles Dellschau, a Prussian immigrant had finally been discovered, nearly 50 years after his death in 1923.

The Wright Brothers wouldn’t even make their famous first flight until 1903, but Dellschau draws dapperly-dressed men piloting brightly-coloured airships and helicopters with revolving generators and retractable landing gear. No records have ever been found of the Sonora Aero Club but Dellschau’s artworks hide a secret coded story. Whatever it was that he had to say was apparently too private even for his own notebooks and even today, much of the mystery has yet to be revealed.

A Mr. Pete Navarro, graphic artist and UFO researcher, heard about the “Flight” exhibition in 1969 and became enthralled. He believed there was a connection between Dellschau’s drawings and mysterious mass of “airship” sightings at the turn of the century across 18 states from California to Indiana. In 1972, he discovered that 8 remaining books of Dellschau were still sitting at the junk shop, unwanted and unclaimed. He bought the lot and spent the next 15 years obsessively decoding Dellschau’s work.

Read more at MessyNessyChic

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13 Jan

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Inuit Art

January 13, 2016 | By |

Baker_Lake_Wall_Hanging_-_Victoria_MamnguqsualukVictoria Mamnguqsualuk, Hunters (detail)

In the early 1950s, works by Inuit artists began to be sold. Since that era, widely recognized as the beginning of contemporary Inuit art, artists have been creating unique artworks inspired by traditional life on the land, the natural and spirit world, lived experiences, stories and legends. They have been experimenting with a variety of artistic media and techniques resulting in distinctive personal styles.

Fabric collage wall hangings emerged during the 1970s. Inuit women adapted their traditional sewing skills and mastery of stitchery to create high-quality artworks from wool duffle or stroud with felt appliqués and embroidery. The artworks depict a variety of subjects ranging from narrative traditional camp life scenes to arctic animals and the spirit world.exhibition_145_media_file_3151Naomi Ityi, Untitled, c. 1973. Wool felt, embroidery floss on wool duffle Collection of the Winnipeg Art Gallery.

Feheley Fine Arts Gallery in Canada has a large collection to give you some more inspiration.

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08 Jan

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Spiegel der Verf Konst

January 8, 2016 | By |

colors-1271 Years Before Pantone, an Artist Mixed and Described Every Color Imaginable in an 800-Page Book.

In 1692 an artist known only as “A. Boogert” sat down to write a book in Dutch about mixing watercolors. Not only would he begin the book with a bit about the use of color in painting, but would go on to explain how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two, or three parts of water. The premise sounds simple enough, but the final product is almost unfathomable in its detail and scope.

Spanning nearly 800 completely handwritten (and painted) pages, Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau, was probably the most comprehensive guide to paint and color of its time. The color book was probably intended as an educational guide. The irony being there was only a single copy that was probably seen by very few eyes.

It’s hard not to compare the hundreds of pages of color to its contemporary equivalent, the Pantone Color Guide, which wouldn’t be published for the first time until 1963.

The entire book is viewable in high resolution here.

colors-2 colors-3  colors-4-1 The book is currently kept at the Bibliothèque Méjanes in Aix-en-Provence, France.

08 Jan

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The Cyanometer

January 8, 2016 | By |

cyanThe Cyanometer Is a 225-year-old tool for measuring the blueness of the sky. It was invented in 1789 by Swiss physicist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure and German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt who used the circular array of 53 shaded sections in experiments above the skies over Geneva, Chamonix and Mont Blanc.

The Cyanometer helped lead to a successful conclusion that the blueness of the sky is a measure of transparency caused by the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere.

Source: This is Colossal

18 Sep

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House of Hackney & William Morris

September 18, 2015 | By |

HofH_shop-2-2_633For Autumn / Winter 2015 House of Hackney reimagines William Morris with a psychedelic trip through his archives. Morris classics such as ‘Peacock & Dragaon’, ‘Hyacinth’ and ‘Blackthorn’ are reworked for a new generation. The House of Hackney print, ‘Artemis’, an ode to William Morris, completes this stunning collection.

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House of Hackney was founded in London in 2010 by husband-and-wife team Javvy
M Royle and Frieda Gormley. Originally founded as an interiors label, the founders’
quest was ‘to take the beige out of interiors’ with an emphasis on quality, design and Made in England.

After a decade of bland minimalism, the brand captured the zeitgeist with its collections of British-made collection of prints and products that are steeped in tradition, but are bold and subversive for a truly modern statement.

Today, House of Hackney has evolved into a successful British-made brand incorporating interiors, fashion and lifestyle divisions. House of Hackney has achieved cult status amongst its loyal customer-base of tastemakers, celebrities and interior designers, and has become the go-to British brand for its iconic printed collections.

15 May

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Walter Hugo for Paul Smith

May 15, 2015 | By |

Paul-Smith-Red-Ear-Fall-2013-1-630x371Born and raised in London, Walter Hugo has centered his work on using scientific processes to pioneer the modern development of early photographic techniques. Hugo’s creations are wonderfully laboured, capturing the life of the subject in an unparalleled way and engaging with the history of photography in an entirely contemporary manner.

For the 2013 winter collection of Paul Smith Hugo photographed using a giant pinhole camera. With Walter using a 19th century brass lens, the subjects had to sit incredibly still as the camera had a four second exposure. The developing chemicals were on site for immediate processing and there were no negatives, each image being completely unique. Paul worked with Walter on the final edit and the options not selected were destroyed to leave final eight portraits.

After the photographs were dry, Paul and Walter worked on the colour palette for hand colouring. Walter subsequently painted the portraits to highlight certain tones. The treatment was particularly popular in Japan, where hand colouring was a finely practiced art form.

walterhugo.co.uk

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11 May

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The secret possessions of Frida

May 11, 2015 | By |

341992Frida Kahlo’s wardrobe and world is brought to life in Ishiuchi Miyako’s photographs, first seen in AnOther Magazine S/S15.

“If I met her, I wouldn’t ask any questions. I would only want to stare at her and touch her body.” Japanese photographer Ishiuchi Miyako is talking about Frida Kahlo, the subject of her latest body of work. Self-taught Ishiuchi Miyako has been creating powerful and beautiful collections of photographs since the late 1970s, many of them concerned with the passing of time, and last year received the prestigious Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography. In her series Mother’s (2000-05), she photographed the personal articles of her late mother, and in 2007, documented the clothing and personal items of victims of the devastating atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Her training in textile design means that she is appreciative of the delicate subtleties of the forms, structures, colours and fibres of the garments she photographs, and also manages to delicately handle the cultural and personal stories woven into them. “She is not somebody who makes decorative pictures,” says gallerist Michael Hoppen, who is hosting an exhibition of her Frida series at his eponymous London gallery, opening in May. “She’s somebody who really does live and breathe her particular stance on life.”

Source: Another Mag

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19 Mar

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The Fabric of India

March 19, 2015 | By |

8_muslim_borderFrom October 3rd 2015 – January 10th, 2016 the V&A’s “The Fabric of India” will be the first major exhibition to explore the dynamic and multifaceted world of handmade textiles from India from the 3rd to the 21st century.

Showcasing the best of the V&A’s world-renowned collection together with masterpieces from international partners, the exhibition will feature over 200 objects ranging from the 3rd to the 21st century. Objects on display for the first time will be shown alongside renowned masterworks and the very latest in Indian contemporary design. The astonishing skills and variety evident in this incomparably rich tradition will surprise and inform even those with prior knowledge of the subject, and is sure to delight visitors.

Check also the blog of the V&A with many fascinating stories about Indian fabrics.

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10 Mar

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1980s Moscow Olympics

March 10, 2015 | By |

Anastasia_Tsayder_Olympic_Game_80-1For St. Petersburg born photographer Anastasia Tsayder, moving to Moscow came as a shock. Accustomed to the classical architecture of the 19th century, she was surprised to now be surrounded by Soviet style buildings of the late 70’s. She took an interest in the history of the urban development of her new city and found that many of the structures were built for the 1980 Moscow Olympics. Around the time Tsayder moved to Moscow, the country was in full swing preparing for the Sochi 2014 winter games. Interested in legacy of the 1980 Olympic games, she sought out to photograph these now defunct buildings for her series Summer Olympics, as it may serve as an example for the fate of these single use venues in the future.

Shot on a twin-lens Rolleiflex, Tsayder’s intention was to get inside these often forgotten buildings to discover and document their current use, more than thirty years after they were built. Many of the original functions of these sports venues are lost.

Source: Feature Shoot

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